Virgin on the ridiculous!

My broad band has been patchy for a while.

The line had dropped out at regular internals over time. Like most I put up with it for quite a while, but my family complained more and more about the patchy signal as it affected them streaming TV and music.

The download speed was not the best, but the package represented reasonable value for money.

Then I became aware of Yorkshire Broadband from a good friend of mine, who had been using it for a long time. So, I did my research on their easy to use website, and gave them call.

I was soon through to a human being who spoken confidently and clearly about the product. They gave me good advice about the best package for me, and I was signed up.

They took care of the transfer of the line and terminated the current service. Emails, text and phone calls kept me up to speed on the progress of the transfer to the new service.

In the first few days I need to get some advice about my wi-fi signal. A quick call to the UK call centre helped me to solve the issue with sound advice.

This was achieved because the agent had the right skill set and a good knowledge of the technology. A refreshing change from the normal experience of call centres.

This is in stark contrast to another provider who confidently miss sold me a TV, Broadband, and phone package that I was trying to sort out for my father recently.

The small print in the contract showed that the package did not in fact have the TV channels promised. A phone call to the company eventually enabled us to unpick the sale.

A series of three agents spoke to us about the decision to terminate the arrangement. Despite the questions asked, and conversations during the phone call no one passed on information to the next person in the chain.

Each time the story was repeated for the benefit of the supplier, rather than me as the customer. In the end I was passed through to an Indian call centre to an agent who then tried several attempts to sell me an alternative package.

It was clear that each agent had their targets to meet to process my call, and attempt to sell me an alternative. In the end I got what my father wanted – an ending of the contract that we had been miss sold, and a promise that nothing has been done to terminate the existing package. We will have to wait and see!

All of this could have been avoided.

It was complete waste of time from a customer view-point. At point of sale the nature of the phone call had focused upon the detail in the TV package, as I knew exactly what my father wanted.

The agent went for the sale by failing to be specific about the package, and in effect made false promises.

He could have saved us all a lot of wasted time, and the company a lot of money. But, targets drove him to push for a sale and get his performance for the day.

I very much doubt that the link will be made between the call handler and the cancellation of the contract. This will be handled by separate functions set up with targets and response times.

If only they measured what matters to the customers, they would learn so much more! Alas, they will continue to mislead customers by chasing false targets in the belief that they are offering good service, instead of focusing upon what matters to the customer.

It’s true Yorkshire broadband for me!

A conversation this weekend stopped me in my tracks.

A conversation this weekend stopped me in my tracks. A friend of mine told me a story about something that happened to him at work this week.  He overheard a call to one of his team from their internal sales call centre. It transpired that a customer had requested a delivery, nothing special you might think? However, the sale had come from a business a couple of hundred yards from where he was currently located. The irony was that the sales assistant in the call centre two hundred miles away was explaining that the order could not be placed with the local depot. Instead she advised that it had to come from a depot 50 miles away!

The logic – the sales targets indicated that the product needed to be delivered from that depot 50 miles away, other wise they would not hit their sales target for the month. Fortunately, my friend who was the manager over both sites stepped in to over rule the decision. He said to me ‘I thought this is madness,  I was prepared to take the consequences, and so I overruled the decision. The decision was ridiculous. Sales were not happy’. This got us on to a conversation about the stupidity of targets and the effect that they have within businesses. For the sake of a sales target the business was prepared to spend more cash delivering tonnes of product by taking a 100 mile round trip. How can this be good for business?

Fortunately my friend has a systemic view of the world, and was able to allow common sense to prevail and take executive action. He could see how barmy this decision really was.

The worrying thing is that If he had not been in the right place at the right time the business would have lost money, but it would have hit it’s sale targets for the month. How barmy is that!

He was the first to recognise that the sales team will be making arbitrary decisions like this every day. The sad thing is that he feels powerless to impact the command and control style of management that operates within the business.

Boys from the black stuff the story goes on…

If you read the first instalment you will already know that the council came to resurface a road nearby where I live. It’s a road that I travel on at least once a day. It’s a busy road. It took them over a week to get the job done. The work was packaged into discrete components that obviously suited the work schedule and the works order, but singularly failed to deliver a good outcome for local people. Not least because six drains were left blocked by the ‘expert’ work of the team on the ground, whose job it was to remove and re lay the top surface. So, I decided to log the issue of blocked drains using the on-line e form and wait to see what happened. I would have called them, but it was going to cost me money to call them and help them do their job. Why would I bother doing that?

It was not easy to find the form on the web site. You had to know your way around local government departments to find it. Anyway, a few minutes after logging the call  I get an auto response back saying that the ‘aim’ to respond in 48 hours. An hour later another email arrives. A speedy outcome I can hear you thinking. Sadly not! A note to say that the call has now been logged in the highways system and passed to a Highways Inspector who will inspect and decide upon the action required, and that this will be planned and prioritised as seen appropriate. I am then advised that if I want an up date on this matter then I can call the contact centre after 10 days and they will advise me of progress.

Having taken breath, I dropped them a line back to say that the drains did not need inspecting –  they needed clearing! Needless to say they have not as yet responded to my comment. The saga goes on..

But it does not end there. In the local paper at the weekend I read an interesting article “Streets like a minefield’. It talked about the dangerous obstacles faced after the surface had been left pitted and potholed. Apparently three people had been injured as a result of falling over on the poor surface. A local Town Councillor was quoted as saying ‘it’s ludicrous’. Unsurprisingly, no one from the Highways Department was available to comment.

Good job well done?

The councillor is right, along with the resultant insurance claims that will surely follow the cost of this job will rocket as lawyers and bureaucrats from different parts of the council come together to defend their corner. And for what?

The chaos comes down to the design and management of work. Budgets, targets, inspections, specifications all prevent the workers on the ground from doing the right thing. The contact centre operation has so far added only cost into the process, keying data into a back office system, generating pointless emails and doing their level best to dissuade me from contacting them again. I could show them how to save a bob or two.

The clock is ticking on the blocked drains. Poor weather is forecast and even more problems will mount if action is not taken quickly to sort out the failures caused by the work done so far.  Watch this space….

Money down the drain!

Can you spot the problem here? The team on the job left the site after a job well done!

Is this good work? Time, money and effort go into resurfacing a road that creates more work for another team to fix the failure. There is not one, but six drains like this!

Time pressure, unit costing and specification all got in the way of a job done right first time. I assume that the road has been not yet been inspected. This is another function that is better built into the role of those doing the work.

Do councils really have money to pour down the drain?

A change of leadership thinking is required, but are they up for it?

Money for nothing!

Today I had to spend a few more quid speaking to a well known embassy to try and sort out the ongoing saga of a travel visa. For those of you unfortunate enough to have to get a visa for America will know how problematic it can be to get good advice. The web site failed to answer my basis questions, the search on the site  just lists media articles that are no use or ornament. So, off I go again spending £1.23 a minute plus network charges for the privilege of talking to a call centre operator somewhere on planet earth. The first minute is a sales pitch that you cannot bypass. I had to get to option 4 to get the access I needed, another minute gone; so £2.50 in and I had nothing to show for my efforts.

The query simple really- the travel plans had changed so what needed to happen next. Eventually I got through to a chap, we will call him Jim. I gave him a concise story and asked what needed to happen. He assured me that the visa would be ok and would stay in operation. He even suggested that provided I got into the country before the visa expired that I could stay out on the student visa until the end of my studies. Jim said he wanted to check some more info and would I hold, well what could I say-  he had me by the short and curlys really. So, off he went, eventually he came back apologising for the delay. The conversation went on a bit longer and then he said that he needed to speak to a specialist supervisor. Guess what I go on hold and he disappears to get help. Time and money is ticking away, but what can I do… Then he is back and guess what everything that he has said before is rubbish! He confirms that having taken more advice that in fact the visa will not cover the revised plans and that I will have to start from scratch. The visa that I have set up cannot be cancelled, and I cannot have a refund. Great news! Well at least I ended up getting an answer to my question, and to be honest I was not entirely surprised by the answer. However, the cost of this privilege ran to another 15 quid.

My beef is that the system, like most contact centre operations is flawed: Well at least from the customers view point. This particular contact centre is a licence to print money. Not only do you get charged a significant amount for the visa itself but you have to spend, on my count, an average of £12.50 for the privilege of speaking to someone. I have no idea what the leaders in this system get up to, well I do really, but they certainly do not understand anything about the nature of customer demand in their system. If they did they would have call handlers that were trained to answer calls against an understanding of customer demand. My question was not difficult, and yet Jim had to get help twice at my time and expense! Of course to the call centre manager it’s money in the bank –  the longer the call goes on the better. If the supervisor had answered the call I would have got an answer in less that half the time. Good news for me, but not for the business. A crazy world!

O2 or Orange?

Well O2 have been taking a fair amount of stick recently over the loss of their network and the thought of trying to sort out a problem with O2 filled me with dread.

Where is help when you need it? I don’t know about you but i am  increasing dependent upon mobile technology to help me manage my busy life. To lose access to your phone, email, and calendar feels like loosing a part of you. How can we function without it?

Well, the other day the worst of nightmares, but not for me but my partner.  She looked at her phone and said that strange  the network message on my phone is  showing no sim! What could this mean i wondered, and soon found out. No access to all the key information that she depended upon. Oh let me have a look at it i said willingly. In truth i had no idea what i might do to fix it.  I tried a bit of DIY – took the sim card out. Even that was a challenge. I had to find the special little key that helps to extract the sim from the body of the phone. Luckily i remembered that i had put it in my man draw. After a bit of searching i found what i was looking for. Ah ha! Anyway two or three goes at removing the sim and cleaning it proved no different, even when i combined it with the classic IT helped advice of switching it off and back on again. I was stumped at least for now. Feeling a little deflated i said that i did not know what to do next, and that she would have to go and get help from the local phone shop.

The next day proved a busy day for both of us and i was worried as i left that my wife did not have access to the phone, she would not be able to keep on touch with the kids. Shocking really isn’t it that we feel so dependent upon bits of technology to help us run our lives. Anyway, she was left trying to find a way to fit in a trip to the phone shop along with everything else in her busy day. I was left feeling that i should have been able to fix it, but what could i do?

As luck would have it i came out of my morning appointment slightly early. I dropped in to one of the mobile shops that sells all major brands of phones and packages and asked them what advice they could give me. Despite the fact that they sell the 02 network they could offer no useful advice, other than to visit an 02 shop. I dropped in to an Orange shop, as a current arrange user i thought that they might be able to offer me some advice as they sold the particular handset, but no they too suggested an 02 shop.  Whilst i was on i had been having a problem with accessing my online account. So i thought this would be a great opportunity to resolve the matter while i was with a real person, rather than a remote voice in a call centre. I explained that the web site did not offer me the help that i needed and that there was no obvious way to get help on the site. He went away to talk to an anonymous person in the back, probably the manager busy doing more important things out of the way of the paying customer. After waiting a couple of minutes the helpful chap came back and said that he knew that there was a number because he had given it to another customer in the past, but that he could not remember it. His boss had no idea. So that best thing to do was to call 150 from my phone and see if they could help me. Great help!

Disappointed  i walked out of the shop still keen to try and fix the problem with my wifes phone. As luck would have it i came across an 02 shop. I walked in and spoke to a really helpful employee. I briefly explained the problem and what i had tried to do to fix it. She listened intently.  I was keen to know if the sim needed replacing. Myabe not she said. Can i suggest that you try two things before taking the phone into an 02 shop. Within a minute she had explained and demonstrated what i needed to do to try and fix the issue.

Well i though it must be worth a try. So i took the bull by the horns and phoned my wife at work. Thanks to the demonstration offered by the sales assistant in the shop i talked her through the first of two reset procedures.  Within in two minutes the phone had rebooted and hooray the connection to the network had been restored.  A problem fixed through the expert knowledge of a key worker who had the skills and knowledge available in the shop to first explain and the demonstrate what i needed to do to restore the service to the sim card. An excellent example of having the technical knowledge in the right place to help the customer.

All the other shops on the high street that i visited and who claimed that they could not help me could learn a thing or two from the women who helped me in the 02 shop. In the end the procedure that she offered could have been explained by any of the assistants in the other shops as i have since learned by looking at my own phone on the orange network that the same procedure will reset my phone.

So to unhelpful staff in the  Orange shop who referred me to dial 150 to sort my problem out i would say study the demands that are made by customers like me in your shops and make sure that the colleagues that you employee at the front line have the basic technical knowledge and skill to help customers whilst they are in the shop. Fending me off to a call centre is not the answer. It costs you more, both in terms of bottom line and importantly by brand reputation. After all if you had done a good job in the moment i would not have been tempted to compare your service with that of the assistant in the 02 shop.

Think on!

And for anyone with an iPhone that hits the same problem go to settings/general scroll to the bottom of the page and touch reset. Look for reset network setting and follow the instructions. If that fails switch the phone off by holding down the on off button on the top of the handset and the circular menu button together until the phone completely shuts down. Failing that

Room service

I have been using a hotel recently on business and have managed to strike up a good relationship with the local staff. My business priorities changed after I had made a booking locally at the hotel. No worries I thought I will ring them and let them know that I need to change my plans. That’s when the fun started. How hard can it be?  Well I was about to find out!

I googled the hotel to find the number and make the call. I hit an IVR system, I thought this is strange –  the hotel is not that big and an IVR system seemed a bit over the top. I started musing about the IT salesperson the had flogged them an overly specified system for the purpose. A large bonus would have resulted and you would have not seen him/her for dust. Anyway, back from my day-dream and  having chosen the bookings option I was then surprised to hear that I was 5th in the queue! It started to dawn upon me that this was not a call that was going to be answered by the hotel reception, but by a call centre somewhere in the world. To cap it all the message playing advised me that I was being charged 10 p a minute by the hotel for the call and I was still 5th in the queue. At this point I thought stuff it! I put the phone down and emailed the local sales manager at the hotel to make her aware of my experience and to change my booking. She answered first thing the following morning and all was well.

Upon my arrival at the hotel the sales manager immediately apologised for my experience and said that they had no control over the phone calls. The hotel group to which they now belonged had centralised it call handling facility some time ago and that there was nothing that she could officially  do. However, she then whispered that I could have the local number for reception which is managed about 20 hours a day and that they would be very happy to help me in future. Of course she was quick to let me know that this was against company policy,and she could be shot for giving the number to me. Shot for doing the right thing!

The conversation then went on to reveal that the centralisation of the booking system causes all sorts of problems for not only the customers, but also to the local staff. She said, Imagine trying to book a conference or a wedding through a call handler somewhere else in the world who does not understand the local hotel, its provisions etc.  It causes a lot of problems which have to be sorted out once the hotel become aware of the booking, causing duplication of effort and frustration for the customer who is keen to ensure that their event goes off well. As is always the case the local team pull together and do their best to make sure that the customer gets what they want on a way that best suits their needs, but at what cost to the business and its hard-working employees?

Another classic case of a bunch of suits in an ivory tower somewhere in the world thinking that they can save money by centralising and standardising their approach to customer enquiries. Of course they will be using a bunch of metrics that tell them that the system works wonderfully and probably also helps to justify the decision to invest in the IVR system and call centre operation. If only those guys got out of their tower and came to study and understand the reality of their decision through the yes of the customer and colleagues in the workplace they would understand that all was not what it seemed. Until then I will use the local phone number to sort out my accommodation. However, the obvious frustrations and morale of the staff will continue to suffer along with the reputation and lost business to the hotel and others in the chain until someone is brave enough to wake and realise that this does not make good business sense.