Your call is important to us…

Like most of us I have a busy lifestyle and sometime need to be able to sort out banking stuff on the move.

I received a flier through the post from my bank inviting me to set up a special password that would allow me easier access to my accounts without the need to remember the name of my first cat, my grandmothers maiden name, the colour of my first car, and the details of a payment that I made a week ago in a supermarket .

Great idea, or so it seemed at the time. So I filled in the form and returned it as directed. The flier said that I would get a call from an agent to set up my unique access. When that did not happen I noticed an email in my spam list inviting me to call them to set up the access.

They save the time, you make the effort! So, I pulled out all the history information that I knew that I would need to get past security laid it all out in front of me and made the call.

The IVR kicked in and I entered  a string of numbers for sort code and account code, date of birth etc. etc. eventually I got through to an agent who calmly advised me that the section that I needed to talk to had closed for the day and that I should ring back! With that the phone went dead.

So much for good old fashioned customer service! Of course it was not the agents fault, she was only following orders: It was all about the design and management of work.

Will anyone notice, will anyone bother to listen to the tape and learn from their mistakes? I doubt it. The system works perfectly from a management view point.

The IVR routed me correctly through a series of checks to filter me and ensure that all the data that was needed to minimise the length of my call time was collected at my time and expense.

The average handling time would have been well within target. The problem from a customer point of view was that I did not get the service that I needed.

Does anyone care about creating value for the customer?

So much for phone banking, now where is my cheque book!

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Scottish Power it goes on….

To my surprise I received a letter today from my utility company telling my how sorry they were that I had made a complaint.

The letter, computer generated obviously, gave me a complaint reference number a seven digit number, so they must get a few!

The letter outlines a three stage process to resolve my complaint. The letter tells me that If the complaint cannot be dealt with immediately it will be passed to the Customer Care Team, where a dedicated member of this specialist  team will resolve my query with 10 working days –  keeping me fully informed of progress throughout.

In the unlikely event that I am not satisfied the Customer Service Director will review it personally. Apparently I can also contact the Ombudsman if I am not happy.

Well those of you who read my last blog will know that I escalated the call to the Customer Care Team on the day and they intervened to sort out the cock up created by the system.

So now the computer has generated yet more waste by sending me a letter.

I have no doubt that the performance indicators for both the call hander and the customer care team log a positive outcome to my complaint which I have no doubt will be closed within the 10 days set as a target.

A bonus may even hang on this! All of this is costing Scottish Power to fix, but it’s not helping me the bill payer –  its all waste and pouring our money down the drain.

I cannot wait to see what the next letter says.

Scottish Power to your elbow

I took advantage of the energy deals that were around in the autumn of last year and switched supplier to cap my rate.

All went smoothly until this week.

Out of the blue I recieved an email from Scottish Power telling me that they had increased my direct debit by 50%.

To say that I was surprised was an understatement! How could this be I wondered, I took time to calcuate my last years consumption to make the transfer.

The Scottish Power computer told us how much we needed to pay. A good deal, and the job done. making efficiencies

So, I thought that I would make a call to express my surprise and find a solution that suited me.

I waded my way through the usual obstacles of the call routing system that did its best to pursuade me that I did not need to speak to a person and ended up speaking to an unhelpful agent.

Not her fault you understand she had an impossible job in a crap system. No the less her manner left a lot to be desired, and only served to make me more determined to escalate that issue.

She was adamant that the computer said that I owed money and that the direct debit could not be changed.

I quietly explained to her that this was the winter quarter and that I was a new customer, and that as a result the calculation that had been made not three months previously was correct .

She was robust in her view that I had no option but to pay the revised amount.

Now at this point some people would have checked out and put the phone down believing that they had no option ( I bet a lot do, as this is the game that the company want to play afterall its better to have the cash in the company’s account than the customers.You have to keep the shareholders happy).

However, I was quick to advise the agent that I was not taking no for an answer. After a pause, she said that she would log my concerns on the system as a complaint.

Further intransigence on my part finally got her to put the call through to customer services.

The music played out for a good five minutes, and I wondered what was going to happen. Then, all at once the tone of the call changed completely.

At last I was talking to someone with a bit of common sense. The Superviser immediately said that she understood my issue and would withdraw the revised direct debit straight away. Hooray! A victory for common sense.

I asked her if this happened often, oh yes she said it happens when new customers transfer accounts during the winter period.

The computer automatically calculates based upon useage and sends out automatic changes to direct debits and even automates the email to the customer.

I asked if she thought that this might be a training issue for the front line so that they understood this and could respond more effectively to customers in the first place.

Her enthusiastic reply was that there were a number of issues that had to be taken into account with the customer and that the agents did not have all the answers.

She missed my point completely!

However, I did get my problem fixed.

So what did I learn from this experience?

  • They have an IT system that automatically upsets customers on a regular basis, because it cannot cope with complexity. It causes frustrated customers to have to wait in a queue to sort out mistakes at their own time and expense. It drives costs in to their system.
  • They have a call handling system that is not designed against the demands placed upon it from their customers.
  • They have call agents who are not trained to deal with frequent calls.

Now commercially you might think that this makes sense.  How many poor unsuspecting customers will just follow what the computer says?

But what does this do for customer relations and customer loyalty? (Scottish Power proudly boasted in an email to me the following day that they had a 91% customer satisfaction rate, and are in the top 50 most improved contact centres).

What are they rating and measuring I wonder to benchmark themselves with others?

Notwithstanding the impact upon the customer the current system drives lots of waste in to their organisation, driving up their costs.

The system generates a change to a direct debit to my bank, and all the accounting activity that goes on behind the scenes, it generates an email to me.

I phone them and they spend 20 mins on the phone, they update and record info in their systems, and pass calls around to supervisors and other departments whilst I wait on the phone.

The result is that all the automatic actions made by the computer have to be manually corrected, and my bank notified of the change. I wonder how much that cost?

The chances are that they will not even see this as an issue.

The waste is hidden in the flow of work around their system and will be owned and managed by different managers. Each will in turn have a focus upon a target to manage their bit.

No one will have their eye on the bigger picture because they are too far removed from understanding the end to end workflow in practice. If they did they would be very interested to listen back to my call and follow the issue back to its root within the business.

Perhaps if a few more leaders got back into the work and understood the true what and why of performance they would begin to focus upon acting on the system and improving outcomes for customers and share holders.

Until then keep an eye on your utility bills and challenge the providers all the way.

An very interesting insight into operational life on the front line, and the impact that current management thinking has upon all concerned in the blog.

Mental Health Cop

Two things happened to me recently to cause my head a brief period of cognitive dissonance as I unwound from my LATE shift last night.  I recently went to work to find a person in the cells who had not long been arrested under section 136 of the Mental Health Act.  I noticed when I got home from work yesterday, a Twitter remark from an A&E Consultant questioning why he and his staff should have to put with aggressive behaviour from the public and being shouted at?

These two things got me thinking –

EMERGENCY MENTAL HEALTH CARE

The person detained under s136 had been removed to the cells because the Place of Safety in the area concerned had been telephoned by the police control room after arrest to notify them that officers would be heading towards them with a detainee and were asked, “Have they been violent?”  In fairness…

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48 ways to save!

making efficienciesHere is an interesting blog about the focus of the government upon shared services in local government, and the belief that it will save billions of pounds for the tax payer. Evidence from practice highlights the fact that sharing services is more likely to add cost in whole system terms than reduce it. The current rhetoric only measures certain parts of the process to make it look successful. Be careful what you wish for Mr Pickles.

Pickle’s pamphlet ‘Now only 48 ways to save’?.

Two times three or six?

I was looking for a bulb for the kitchen recently. The pack of six looked a bargain, until I saw the price of a pack of three! It’s the system stupid!

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Money down the drain

You may recall that on the 3rd Sept I reported a fault through my local county council web site. The issue resulted from poor workmanship. A resurfacing job had been undertaken on a road close to my house which had resulted in surface dressing blocking a series of drains on the road.

Well  I recently noticed that a few of the drains had been cleared. Good news, I hear you cry! Guess what,  they missed the key drain on the entrance to a side road joining a main road. How could they miss it? After all the note from the council advised me that the referral would need to be inspected before any action would be taken. Well a few weeks passed before the drains were cleared. So, what did the inspector actually do on the site I wonder? Did he/she even get out of their car?

Remember that this is all additional cost. If the job had been done correctly in the first place then no follow up would have been necessary.  The inspection has clearly added no value, and the rework to return yet again to the site will add further cost. Believe me it will be necessary for the inspector to return to site and inspect the drain that he/she missed the last time. The rate we are going the road will need resurfacing before the drain gets unblocked. All we have to do is hope that in he meantime an accident does not arise as a result of the eater that will run on the main road. The season suggests that standing water will freeze leaving.

Functionalisation, and the separation of decision making from the work is costing the council a packet. Maybe even enough to fix the generally poor state of the roads in the county.

I feel duty bound to let them know that they have failed yet again to do the job properly. I bet nothing happen this side of the festive break.

Sorry, never heard of him mate.

There is a lot of talk about the importance of leadership in organisations today. Imagine my amazement when I went into an organisation recently and asked for a senior leader by name only to be told by the receptionist  on the front desk that he had ‘never heard of him’. Is he new here the guy asked me? No,  I replied he has been here for a good while. Let me check the online directory for you he said obligingly. A few minutes later he still could not find the location of the individual. I asked the receptionist if this happened often, oh yes mate came the reply –  we are always the last to know down here. He scratched his head and rang another receptionist on a different entrance to the building for some advice.  This time our luck was in and I was pointed in the right direction. A phone call was made, and I was on my way to the top floor to the executive suite.

It was immediately clear to me that this senior leader was invisible in his own organisation. How can this be I wondered? Ironically for me the purpose of the meeting was to introduce myself as his potential executive coach. I focused initially upon asking him about what he paid attention to during his day, and what took up his time.  It was quickly apparent to me that he never left the top floor –  spending his day in endless meetings, on the phone in conference calls and answering emails. He had no time to understand the workings of his own organisation, or to engage with colleagues who were delivering vital services on a daily basis. Instead he relied upon management information fed to him by his advisers, and gave instructions based upon the ‘facts’ presented to him. It took him a while to realise that the decisions that he made were flawed. Why? well the data that was fed up the line was fabricated along the way at each stage to make it ‘look ok’ for the boss at the next level in the chain. By the time it got to the executive suite it had no resemblance to reality. Nevertheless, this senior chap spent hours and hours in meetings, and on calls using the data presented to run his business.

Imagine the look on his face when we started to unpick the data he relied upon, and went out in to the work to understand what current performance actually looked like!

Only by understanding  your own leadership impact upon the system can you begin to intelligently start to change it. Getting knowledge about how the work happens in reality, and the impact of your leadership actions upon the system as a whole is vital if you are to bring about holistic change rather than tampering with the current operation from your ivory tower. In practice management tampering will always make things worse.