Your call is important to us…

Like most of us I have a busy lifestyle and sometime need to be able to sort out banking stuff on the move.

I received a flier through the post from my bank inviting me to set up a special password that would allow me easier access to my accounts without the need to remember the name of my first cat, my grandmothers maiden name, the colour of my first car, and the details of a payment that I made a week ago in a supermarket .

Great idea, or so it seemed at the time. So I filled in the form and returned it as directed. The flier said that I would get a call from an agent to set up my unique access. When that did not happen I noticed an email in my spam list inviting me to call them to set up the access.

They save the time, you make the effort! So, I pulled out all the history information that I knew that I would need to get past security laid it all out in front of me and made the call.

The IVR kicked in and I entered  a string of numbers for sort code and account code, date of birth etc. etc. eventually I got through to an agent who calmly advised me that the section that I needed to talk to had closed for the day and that I should ring back! With that the phone went dead.

So much for good old fashioned customer service! Of course it was not the agents fault, she was only following orders: It was all about the design and management of work.

Will anyone notice, will anyone bother to listen to the tape and learn from their mistakes? I doubt it. The system works perfectly from a management view point.

The IVR routed me correctly through a series of checks to filter me and ensure that all the data that was needed to minimise the length of my call time was collected at my time and expense.

The average handling time would have been well within target. The problem from a customer point of view was that I did not get the service that I needed.

Does anyone care about creating value for the customer?

So much for phone banking, now where is my cheque book!

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What would the boss say?

I have been involved in a few conversations in recent days where the subject of what the boss would say came up in conversation. It’s fascinating  that employees  fuss over what the boss will think. It shows a lot about the culture that operates within such organisations. In some cases careers may rest upon pitching it right. Is this what the boss will want to hear? Atfer all bosses only want to hear good news don’t they!

In the instances discussed it appeared to make doing the right thing impossible, or at least as far as that employee was concerned. The shadow left by the leader lasts long after they have moved on. In one of the discussions the leader was no longer even in the business, but their image left a lasting legacy and this was having a material impact upon current operational performance.

When I delved deeper into the conversations I find that the truth is that many people do not actually know what there boss would actually say or do. Folklore makes up the gap. People exaggerate experiences to warn others off from crossing the line and questioning the bosses thinking. Hierarchy plays its part. Looking down  its can be in the best interests of bosses to allow the myths to prevail because its suits their purpose. Possibly to climb the greasy pole, or perhaps to keep others in check. ‘I know the boss well – she would not like to hear that’. Like gossip this is passed on and embellished along the way for effect. The truth becomes distorted and if we are not careful everyone believes the rhetoric –  sometimes even the boss! Looking up the hierarchy all you see is a metaphorical brick wall.  It’s easier to follow the crowd, keep your head down, and do as you are told. Conformity is the name of the game.

Then you get to meet the boss in question, and they are nothing like the character portrayed by the stories that you have heard. They are keen to learn; to engage; to understand how the business works; and how things might be improved.

The problem in todays corporate world is that it is too easy for leaders to become detached from the real operation. In their place comes stories generated by others in the hierarchy often to suit their own purposes that cause the leaders messages to get distorted, or even replaced with the words of others.

The way for a leader to resolve this is simple.  Get out in the work as a routine part of your day, build trust and confidence, and find out what is really going on out there. When you find things that are getting in the way, or that others cannot sort or fix act to resolve the issue. Generate a true image of who you are and what you stand for. If you have the customer at the heart of your thinking and understand what matters to them you will not go far wrong.

Get started tomorrow by blocking time out and go and do some action research. You will be amazed what is really going on outside your glass box.

A conversation this weekend stopped me in my tracks.

A conversation this weekend stopped me in my tracks. A friend of mine told me a story about something that happened to him at work this week.  He overheard a call to one of his team from their internal sales call centre. It transpired that a customer had requested a delivery, nothing special you might think? However, the sale had come from a business a couple of hundred yards from where he was currently located. The irony was that the sales assistant in the call centre two hundred miles away was explaining that the order could not be placed with the local depot. Instead she advised that it had to come from a depot 50 miles away!

The logic – the sales targets indicated that the product needed to be delivered from that depot 50 miles away, other wise they would not hit their sales target for the month. Fortunately, my friend who was the manager over both sites stepped in to over rule the decision. He said to me ‘I thought this is madness,  I was prepared to take the consequences, and so I overruled the decision. The decision was ridiculous. Sales were not happy’. This got us on to a conversation about the stupidity of targets and the effect that they have within businesses. For the sake of a sales target the business was prepared to spend more cash delivering tonnes of product by taking a 100 mile round trip. How can this be good for business?

Fortunately my friend has a systemic view of the world, and was able to allow common sense to prevail and take executive action. He could see how barmy this decision really was.

The worrying thing is that If he had not been in the right place at the right time the business would have lost money, but it would have hit it’s sale targets for the month. How barmy is that!

He was the first to recognise that the sales team will be making arbitrary decisions like this every day. The sad thing is that he feels powerless to impact the command and control style of management that operates within the business.

Money down the drain!

Can you spot the problem here? The team on the job left the site after a job well done!

Is this good work? Time, money and effort go into resurfacing a road that creates more work for another team to fix the failure. There is not one, but six drains like this!

Time pressure, unit costing and specification all got in the way of a job done right first time. I assume that the road has been not yet been inspected. This is another function that is better built into the role of those doing the work.

Do councils really have money to pour down the drain?

A change of leadership thinking is required, but are they up for it?

How many plates can you spin at a time?

I have been working with a client recently who was very keen to progress a piece of work. Four weeks ago we set up a phone call. I made sure that it was arranged to suit his diary. An hour before the scheduled time I get an email to say that he needs to rearrange as sometime urgent had come up. I thought fair enough, issues crop up from time to time that need urgent attention.  So off we started again to find a date and time to suit. Again I shuffled my diary to make the appointment. Guess what a few days later another email arrives to rearrange the phone call! Is this a pattern I wondered?

Sure enough the answer was yes. This saga happens on four occasions in the period. Then to cap it all on the day of the last appointment I get an email to say that he is running late and will call me as soon as possible.

Well the clear message to me is that this individual either had an acute problem  with time management, or did not see the piece of work that he was so  desperate to progress with me as a priority after all. In the event the phone call did go ahead, but he had not really had time to think through what he wanted to achieve and we ended up having a faltering discussion almost off the cuff. Is this really the way to make effective use of time in organisations.

The pressure to fill the diary up with meetings, fiddle with smart phones (often in meetings) and farm emails occupies far too much time for the average employee. It seems that there is no time to think in organisations today.

A quick piece of analysis on the email account and the diary would reveal a lot about the organisation and its culture, along with the preoccupations of the employee in question. If managers studied their work and it’s impact they would learn that  in practice much of the time spent in meetings has no productive impact upon meeting customer demand, if anything it is likely to make things worst.

Email trails often reveal the games played in organisations to shuffle responsibility and protect ones back from criticism. The .cc culture, and check with mentality causes a lot of wasted time. Time that could be better spent  in the work fixing issues that stop employees from delivering excellent service to customers. Perhaps If only there were not so many plates spinning managers would have time to do more of the right thing. I wonder who started all those plates spinning in the first place? Well managers of course! What else would they do if they did not have to run around spinning all those plates!

It’s a pity that managers have no time to stop and think about the true impact of their actions in the work. If they did they would be horrified to find that the outcome of their labours invariably made matters worse!

The lesson is that in practice if you focus upon one plate at a time you will end up spinning more plates in the long run. Counter intuitive it may be, but try it for yourself. You would be wise to take a hard look at what clutters your diary and email whilst you are on. You will be amazed at how much time you can create. The challenge then is to use the time to study and understand how the current system works, before trying to change it, rather than tinker and make it worse.

Sheep dipping or feathering nests?

A friend of mine called Jane mentioned to me that HR have finally got their programme of courses out for the year, not bad it’s only August. Now she has the task of trying to link the results of her learning and development reviews to the courses on offer. I know that there is usually a bit of a rush on to book places on the courses as the dates are fixed for the year.  Jane admitted that if she was being honest back in February when she was doing her reviews she had no real idea of the development needs of her team because she had not finalised the business plans that had started being written back in November of last year.  Surely, it would make more sense to concentrate learning and development effort based upon the demands placed upon employees by the customer? In that way training monies would be spent at the right time on the right support.  Not on a standard set of events determined remotely by someone in HR months before they are offered.

Anyway back to the story… The Policy team had messed about with the dates for publication in previous years; leaving Jane and her colleagues in the dark about requirements and timescales. This year she told me that she had tried to get ahead and start the conversations with her team and start pulling plans together. Since last year Jane has had to enter all the plans in to an on line system. So, quite rightly she thought that her action was doing the right thing, until Policy decided that yet again they needed to change the format of the plans to make it easier for them to produce the corporate plan for the organisation. I could see by the expression that Jane gave me that she was fuming! Quite rightly so in my view. All of the work that she had already done was in the wrong format, and according to them (Policy) she had to re- enter the information in their new format. Jane admitted that she tried to ignore this requirement for a while, as her plans were already in the system.  Ironically, she said she never used the online system apart from having to enter her performance data once a month. Like most of us, Jane acknowledged that she fudged the numbers to make them look ok, and had not been caught out so far because ‘no one really looks that closely at the data’.

In the end Jane’s name came up on the naughty girls/boys list, and she got a stern email from the Chief Executive’s Office telling her to get her finger out and get her plans in the right format.  Brilliant! You cannot beat a bit of extrinsic motivation to kill morale.

Anyway, Jane decided that she could avoid the issue no longer, took the ‘bull by the horns’ and copy and pasted the detail from one part of the system to the other. A waste of time and effort! I was chatting to another friend the other day and he was telling that a similar thing happens in the organisation in which he works.

What is going on in the world? Can organisations really afford to waste resources messing about changing templates and entering plans into corporate systems? Reality proves that plans get compromised after month one and become a work of fiction as people fudge the system to show progress again objectives that have been rendered worthless in view of changing priorities. The problem is that the new priorities do not replace the last set, they get added to them.  All this planning and monitoring is little more than a smoke screen. We all know that the real work gets done off plan and often by getting around the system to make it happen in a timely fashion.

If leaders took time to understood the true purpose of their organisation in customer terms, and then designed and managed the work around that purpose they would soon learn that all this corporate business planning and performance reporting added no really value to the bottom line. In really it has the reverse impact. Money down the drain!

However, such action takes guts and determination; and too few seem prepared to do what it takes. Sad really!  Leaders are happy to feather their own nest at the expense of others. Not really leadership at all is it!